1. Every app has configuration — at Rainforest we store ours in environment variables and some of it is more sensitive than others. For example, there is usually no good reason for most developers in a company to have access to production database config. So why do they?

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  2. We believe dogfooding our own product has been crucial in helping us decide when to open up Rainforest to public beta. Confident that our product is fast and accurate enough to solve real-world QA needs, this has been a long journey and many things helped us get to this point.

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  3. From now on we're going to be much more visible about the work we're doing inside Rainforest. Over the past year we've been grinding away building an accurate and fast system for getting test results, and we've been so heads down that we have been pretty bad at letting the world know what we're working on.

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  4. We just made a quick video showing you how to get started in Rainforest. The video uses AirBnB as a case-study, and walks through how to: Read more.

  5. After years of frustration with the traditional front end development process, I decided to try and figure out a better way. I'm sharing the rules I came up with in the hope that they may inspire you to experiment with your process.

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  6. n.b. this post has been updated as of July 29th, 2014 for content, and February 2nd, 2015 for links.

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  7. So, you're hosted in a single zone, and if you're in US-East presumably went down last night. Stop it. AWS has seven regions across the world, three of which are in the US. Each region is split in up to five availability zones. You need to use more than just multiple zones if you want to stay up during one of these outages. Cross region is the answer.

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